Gardening ~ Page 2 din 13

Gardening secrets – how to cultivate, how to grow, how to take care of plants, trees and flowers.

Maintenance Tips for Annuals – plants ideas

Annuals plants may be started from seed or purchased as transplants. Follow seed packet instructions as to when and how to plant seeds. Plant seedlings and transplants after the frost-free date for your area. Water the seedlings or new plants evenly. When the annuals plants are 2″ to 4″ in height, pinch off the top part of the plant just above the top set of …

Seeing Black-Eyed Susan

As you contemplate the ruins of last summer’s garden and ponder miracles for next year, give sunny, black-eyed Susans a chance to work some for you. This rustic native plant is the cover story of the summer 1996 issue of The Quarterly Journal of The Perennial Plant Association, and that’s a considerable endorsement. The Quarterly is a small magazine published for nurserymen, wholesalers, and other …

Have You Ever Seen a King Protea?

On the inside is a good place to be as the weather cools and skies turn gray. Specifically, on the inside at the National Arboretum where a huge display of some of the most fascinating flowers in the world are on show (free) now through November 16, 9 am to 4:30 pm, seven days a week. I recently attended the opening of this remarkable exhibit …

Permaculture Bioregionalism and Your Backyard – Morrow R. 1993

Bioregionalism is a movement that reorganizes populations on natural and definable boundaries, in contrast to the artificial boundaries created by state and county lines. In a sustainable design, bioregion helps define the term local for the population. Bioregional stability can be measured by the reduction of imports and exports into the area, and the wealth can be measured by the increase in the biological resources, …

Oatlands Plantation

Two defining features of the Oatlands Plantation Gardens are the terraces installed in the early 1800’s by the plantation builder, George C. Carter, and the English boxwood parterres added in the early 1900’s by Mrs. Edith Corcoran Eustis, wife of the second owner. In the Spring of 1994, the lovely green geometric patterns so familiar to Oatlands visitors had turned brown and ugly, the victims …

Nothing is simple

Nothing is simple. Everything is interconnected. Do I like strawberries? Only if they’ve been sun ripened, organically or biodynamically grown and are the right variety for that area (warm climate strawberries like Red Gauntlet are tasteless in cooler climates) and not if they’re imported because I think it’s immoral to import strawberries, soft fragile little things are so easy to grow in a backyard. Importing …

New York ironweed: Virginia Wildflower of the Year

A plant of great beauty, New York ironweed, Vernonia novaboracensis, fills moist fields and streamsides with its vibrantly colored, violet flowers from mid-Summer to Fall. Its striking appearance and widespread distribution throughout Virginia make it an excellent choice for the Wildflower of the Year. This plant is most frequently recognized by the common name New York ironweed, but is commonly referred to simply as ironweed. …

Endless Variety Among Evergreens: Take Boxwood for Example

Boxwoods offer the gardener a rich variety from which to choose. There are nearly 100 naturally occurring species of this evergreen landscape plant. Most are native to the Caribbean Islands, East Asia, and central Europe. There are also about 300 different boxwood cultivars that grow in the northern Temperate Zone. The National Boxwood collection at the U.S. National Arboretum contains nearly 140 different species and …

Woodland Gardens and Fall Planting

I’ve been fascinated with wildlife gardening since childhood. Rather than family shopping trips or excursions to baseball games, my father would take my brother and I out to the woods in search of wildflowers while my mother led the search for fossils at Ten-Mile Creek. So today, most of my gardening adventures are connected one way or another with the wild garden. And if you …

Native Plants: Up Close and Personal

Native plants have recently become the answer for those gardeners who are tired of pampering fancy exotic imports with toxic chemicals. Because they grow here naturally, many natives are less labor intensive than their finicky cousins from across the sea. For those of you new to the gardening game, here’s the news: The native plant “movement” is in full swing and many terrific natives are …

Growing and saving seeds

When our pioneer forebears prepared for their westward trek, foremost among the few articles they could take with them were seeds. Carefully packed to protect against “varmints” and moisture, the seeds were a cherished possession, for they represented future food for family and livestock. Today the pioneer mentality again becomes meaningful. If I wish to maximize the possibility of my food supply, I need to …

What’s a Tomatillo?

Shortly after my move to Southern California from Pennsylvania, I encountered a first class salsa bar. Brightly colored canisters offered exotic hot peppers, fresh lemon slivers and three varieties of homemade salsa. The first salsa was filled with chunks of tomato and onion, the second gave an aroma of cilantro and the third was green! “What makes that green salsa, green?” I queried a passing …