Medical Folklore

The Encyclopedia of Medical Folklore

Dictionary of Medicinal and Poisonous Plants – Yoruba Names

As I know many of you are interested in finding out the yoruba names for different medicinal plants, I’ve done a research and found a few names for you, and also the use of the plants. Yoruba Names for Medicinal Plants Baphia, camwood, Sanderswood (Baphia nitida) – igiosun, irosun, awewi, owiwi, arase, ajolawo irosu – roots, leaves and stem for inflamation and skin infections. leaves …

World Dictionary of Grasses – Yoruba Grass Name

English – Yoruba Grass Name Thatchgrass – beere, bere Camel grass, lemon grass, true lemon grass, melissa grass, rosha grass, sweet rush, ginger grass, fever grass, citronella grass, mulch grass – koriko oba, koriko oyibo, kooko oba, oko oba, tii, eti, isoko Reeds, commom reed, ditch reed, bamboo reed, reed grass, yellow cane – ifu Melinis, Brazilian stink grass, stink grass, whynne grass, gordura grass, …

Pre-Conquest Mexican medicine (2000 B.C. to 1521 A.D.)

History Mexican medicine developed from approximately 2000 B.C. to 1521 A.D., the time of the Spanish conquest. Although the Spanish conquerors systematically destroyed the great Aztec libraries, making it difficult to identify exactly which practices came originally from which of the Mexican cultures, the Olmecs, Toltecs, and later the Zapotecs and their Mixtec conquerors are believed to have originated and spread the knowledge and civilization …

Chinese Medicine

Chinese medical traditions developed from 2852 B.C. to 220 A.D. The Chinese believed in a world spirit, the Tao, and a cosmic balance between two opposing forces, the Yin and the Yang. The dichotomy of yin and yang was seen everywhere in the Chinese world — female was yin, male was yang; darkness was yin, light was yang; attributions of yin and yang were applied …

Books resource: Herbal and Magical Medicine

About > James Kirkland, et al., eds. Herbal and Magical Medicine: Traditional Healing Today. Duke University Press, 1992. When I sprained my ankle in high school football, my Grandmother offered the following cure: “Wrap the ankle in bacon fat, put the ankle and bacon fat in a plastic bag and then wrap this in a brown paper bag. Sleep with this on and in the …

What is “Medical Folklore”?

In its broadest sense, “folk medicine” can be used to refer to such things as holistic medicine, midwifery, and medical beliefs and practices unique to individual family traditions. A stricter interpretation of the term may exclude traditional practices such as those procedures commonly used in traditional Chinese medicine and Ayurvedic (Indian) medicine. Regardless of how exotic these traditions may be to someone more accustomed to …

Yoruba names for herbs and plants – Nigerian medicine

Yoruba Medicine – History  The medical traditions of the Yoruba people of western Nigeria developed within a culture that deeply respects and venerates ancestors. The orishas, or gods of the Yoruba, were former ancestors such as Oduduwa, the legendary ancestor of all Yoruba people, and his son Ogun. Respect for family and ancestors is so deep that when Yoruba people die, they are buried under …

NATIVE AMERICAN HERBAL MEDICINES

Agave – leaves were used by the Aztecs to cure dysentery. Alder  – used as an astringent on wounds by many tribes. Also used against cramps by the Penobscot and for ague by the Onondaga. Alum Root – used for wounds and sores by many tribes. The Menominee used it for diarrhea. Angelica  – used by the Creeks for stomach problems and worms. Arnica  – used by …

Theory of the Four Humors

Abstract The Theory of the Four Humors centers around the belief that the body is made up of four fluids: blood, phlegm, yellow bile (or choler) and black bile. The proportions of these fluids dictated the health and disposition or temperament of a person. This theory evolved further to include major organs, seasons, elements and primal qualities–all of which influence the balance of humors in …

Gods of Sickness and Healing

A multicultural list Aesculapius – Greek god of healing Agni – Vedic god who caused fever Ashakku – Babylonian demon of fever Eshu Elegba – African trickster god, source of witches’ power to cause sickness Imhotep – Egyptian god of healing Innana – Babylonian goddess of fertility Mata – Northern Indian goddess who causes smallpox Namtaru – Babylonian demon of sickness Nergal – Mesopotamian god …

EGYPTIAN MEDICINE

History Egyptian medicine developed from 3200 B.C. to 30 B.C. within a culture that believed in an afterlife following death. The Egyptians believed that the vital life force of their kings and other important members of Egyptian society, such as priests and t he nobility, could return to reanimate their bodies. This created the necessity of learning how to preserve the bodies of the dead …

ANCIENT ASSYRIAN/BABYLONIAN MEDICINE

History Assyrian/Babylonian medicine developed in Mesopotamia from 3000 B.C. to 1648 B.C. The Babylonian doctors operated within a culture that believed in fearsome gods who used illness to punish people for their sins. These gods included Nergal, god of plagues, Namtaru, the sick-maker, Ashaku, fever demon, and Pazuzu, demon of sickness. The gods were capricious and sometimes would punish not the sinner but others in …